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Webcast: Open Source Doesn’t Have to Be Scary May 14, 2020 (event)

LLNL’s Ian Lee will be featured in a webcast from the Dots and Bridges Thought Leadership Consortium. The event is slated for May 21, 2020, from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM (EST). Participants must register. Webcast abstract:

When it comes to open source, dispelling myths and crystallizing reality are essential. Too often, the conversation focuses on open source as a competitor to proprietary code versus a complementary tool to existing investments. In fact, you may be surprised to discover some of the leading for-profit companies that are using, sponsoring, and contributing to open source projects. At the end of the day, open source is less about Control and more about Community.

LLNL to Host First Virtual Hackathon April 12, 2020 (event)

Held since 2012, LLNL’s hackathons are 24-hour opportunities to brainstorm, foster creativity, prototype, and explore. Participants work in groups or individually and often strive to learn new skills, programming languages, and tools in service to LLNL’s missions. This year’s spring hackathon (April 30 through May 1) will be held virtually. In true hackathon spirit, several tech solutions will enable participants to collaborate remotely. Charalynn Macedo, division leader for LLNL’s Enterprise Applications Services, will kick off the event with a brief keynote presentation.

ISC Is Going Virtual April 08, 2020 (event)

The ISC (formerly known as the International Supercomputing Conference) caters to the hardware and software demands of global research centers and businesses in the fields of HPC, artificial intelligence, machine learning, and data analytics. Instead of meeting in Frankfurt, Germany, this year the conference will be held online during June 22-24. Stay tuned for more information as the program is finalized.

Video: Spack at FOSDEM '20 February 02, 2020 (event-report) (multimedia)

FOSDEM is an annual two-day event promoting the widespread use of free and open source software. The 2020 conference took place in Brussels, Belgium, on February 1–2. Videos of speakers, lightning talks, and other sessions are available on the FOSDEM website. LLNL’s Todd Gamblin led two sessions about the package manager Spack:

LLNL’s Presence in HPC Shines Bright at SC19 December 05, 2019 (event-report)

The 2019 International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage, and Analysis—better known simply as SC19—returned to Denver, and once again LLNL made its presence known as a force in supercomputing. The conference, held November 17 through 22, was attended by nearly 14,000 people representing 118 countries.

Many open source technologies were featured in LLNL’s technical program. Read the full recap on LLNL’s main website.

LLNL-Led Team Wins SC19 Best Paper Award November 22, 2019 (event-report) (story)

On November 22, a panel of judges at the International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis (SC19) awarded a multi-institutional team led by LLNL computer scientists with the conference’s Best Paper award. The paper, entitled “Massively Parallel Infrastructure for Adaptive Multiscale Simulations: Modeling RAS Initiation Pathway for Cancer,” describes the workflow driving a first-of-its-kind multiscale simulation on predictively modeling the dynamics of RAS proteins—a family of proteins whose mutations are linked to more than 30 percent of all human cancers—and their interactions with lipids, the organic compounds that help make up cell membranes.

The team’s software, called MuMMI (Multiscale Machine-Learned Modeling Infrastructure), will soon be released as open source. Read more about the award on LLNL news.

Software Engineering 101: I have some code! Now what? November 12, 2019 (event-report) (story) (this-website)

As part of LLNL’s Computing 101 speaker series, Ian Lee gave a talk to employees on November 12 titled “Software Engineering 101: I have some code! Now what?” The presentation reviewed the Lab’s resources for supporting software engineering and open source development.

Lee, who manages this website and leads many initiatives in the Lab’s open source community, aimed his remarks at relative newcomers to the software development landscape. He also updated the audience on the state of open source development at the Lab.

The Lab provides a wide range of support and solutions for just about any task a developer does: programming languages, package managers, computing platforms, code editors, version control systems, project communication, project tracking, documentation, and much more. Lee provided an overview of these options, offered advice about how to navigate the Lab’s software resources, and encouraged developers to take advantage of colleagues’ knowledge and experience.

Lee summarized the Lab’s recent open source activity, which echoes a trend toward developing “out in the open,”—i.e., not waiting for code to mature before releasing it for community feedback and contributions. (As this website shows, the Lab and affiliated GitHub organizations have almost 600 repos.) Accordingly, the Lab has updated its open source release policies to support modern code development practices.

Among open source projects Lee highlighted in his talk were 2019 R&D 100 Award winners Spack and SCR (Scalable Checkpoint/Restart) and the software stack underpinning the Exascale Computing Project.

Lee also demoed this website’s category-driven design changes, LLNL’s open source logo (and stickers), the @LLNL_OpenSource Twitter account, and Slack channels. He noted that LLNL may have a booth at PyCon 2020, which will be held April 15-23 in Pittsburgh. (Conferences such as PyCon provide LLNL’s open source software community with opportunities for networking, collaboration, and technical skills development. Lab employees interested in attending similar events may contact Ian Lee for funding.)

ESGF Architecture Workshop November 08, 2019 (event-report)

Members of the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) gathered in Abingdon, England, on November 5-7 to kick off the redesign process for the Federation’s computing architecture. Since the original system was designed a decade ago, the number of ESGF’s supported projects and disciplines has grown and diversified. Furthermore, operational requirements are clearer for the ESGF to support an international federated archive of this size. Many of the ESGF nodes now have other functions beyond CMIP (the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project), and the landscape of data repository and science needs has changed.

Led by ESGF’s Executive Committee, the workshop team discussed improvements to the user experience, data repository and management, data compute requirements, and platform and system administration. This workshop concluded with a high-level roadmap for future architecture directions, which will be presented at the larger ESGF conference in March. LLNL’s delegates to the workshop were Ghaleb Abdulla (principal investigator and co-chair of the Executive Committee), Sasha Ames (member of multiple ESGF Working Teams) and Jason Boutte (Compute Working Team member).

JuliaCon Recap and Videos August 22, 2019 (event-report) (multimedia)

LLNL’s Seth Bromberger attended JuliaCon 2019 on July 22–25 in Baltimore, Maryland. He gave a talk on July 24 to a full house: “Using Julia in Secure Environments” (abstract, YouTube video). The focus of the presentation was engaging the community in thinking about transitive package dependencies and the security of the source code supply chain.

Other notable events at the conference included a keynote address by Steven Lee, applied mathematics program manager for Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) within the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science. His presented his office’s computing priorities and mentioned related LLNL work (YouTube video). In addition, LLNL’s Jane Herriman received a Julia Community Prize for her “teaching, outreach, and community stewardship.”

Conferences such as JuliaCon provide LLNL’s open source software community with opportunities for networking, collaboration, and technical skills development. Lab employees interested in attending similar events may contact Ian Lee for funding.

Video: LLNL at the 2019 Red Hat Summit May 08, 2019 (event-report) (multimedia)

At the recent Red Hat Summit in Boston, LLNL’s Robin Goldstone discussed open-source technologies and the Sierra supercomputer. Goldstone, an HPC solutions architect, said “open source makes perfect sense” for scalability and performance in an HPC center like LLNL’s. She stated, “We have all that visibility and that software. If it doesn’t work for our needs, we can make it work for our needs. And then we can give it back to the community because even though people aren’t doing things at the scale that we are today, a lot of the things that we’re doing really do trickle down and be used by a lot of other people.” A transcript of her interview is included with the video, which runs 15:28.

Spack Team Visits RIKEN April 23, 2019 (event-report)

Spack’s first tutorial in Japan took place on April 23, 2019. With more than 40 participants, the onsite tutorial at RIKEN’s Kobe research center was the latest international event for the Spack team and collaborators. Read more about Spack’s European tour of HPC facilities. Everything you need to get started with Spack is available on the website.

Caliper Library Highlighted at 31st VI-HPS Tuning Workshop April 15, 2019 (event-report)

The Virtual Institute – High Productivity Supercomputing (VI-HPS) conducts a long-running series of tuning workshops, where participants can learn about programming tools developed by the institute partners. Morning sessions consist of tool presentations and hands-on exercises. In the afternoon, users can apply the tools to their own codes with the help of the instructors. Whilst most of the workshops take place in Europe, the 31st tuning workshop was held at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK), on April 9–12, 2019.

As part of the workshop, LLNL computer scientist David Boehme conducted a 75-minute tutorial on Caliper, an open-source performance profiling library for HPC software. The session included hands-on exercises using the Lulesh proxy application as an example. There were around 15–20 participants, primarily HPC software developers from UTK and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, as well as the other HPC tool presenters. This tutorial marked the first time Caliper was presented within the VI-HPS tuning workshop series. Boehme’s tutorial was well received, and several participants were able to successfully apply Caliper to their programs.

The workshop also provided an opportunity to discuss common software infrastructure as well as integration and interoperability possibilities with other performance analysis tools. For example, the PAPI team plans to explore using Caliper’s data collection and processing functionality. Finally, as a VI-HPS member organization, LLNL’s participation in the tuning workshop series helped showcase the Lab’s strong portfolio of open-source programming tools among the VI-HPS partners and in the HPC community at large.

Learn more about Caliper:

The Linux Foundation's Open Source Leadership Summit March 15, 2019 (event-report)

The Linux Foundation’s Open Source Leadership Summit occurred in Half Moon Bay, California, on Thursday, March 14. LLNL’s Todd Gamblin presented “Open Source in the Exascale Computing Project: Building a Software Ecosystem for Science.” Check out the conference schedule.

This presentation covered the challenges of building software for machines that don’t exist yet, and how government laboratories, academia, and industry are collaborating to build a highly optimized software distribution. From deploying services like GitLab CI and JupyterHub in high-security HPC centers, challenges for architecture-specific containers, the use of Spack to package and distribute optimized binaries, and the social hurdles of scientists and developers working together, this talk summarized the open source challenges in DOE’s largest-ever HPC software project.

Inaugural NAHOMCon19 Coming to San Diego February 14, 2019 (event)

To all computational scientists, mathematicians, scientists, and engineers interested in high-order methods and PDEs: Several institutions have joined together to organize the inaugural North American High Order Methods Conference (NAHOMCon19). The conference will be held in San Diego in the summer of 2019 and will focus on the many developments in high-order discretizations and applications taking place in North America.

The DOE co-design Center for Efficient Exascale Discretizations (CEED) is pleased to participate in the conference. CEED is a partnership between two U.S. DOE laboratories (Livermore & Argonne) and five universities in support of the Exascale Computing Project.

Learn more:

ESGF Conference Caps a Productive Year February 12, 2019 (event-report)

Held in Washington, DC, the Earth System Grid Federation’s (ESGF) 8th annual face-to-face conference was a lively, fruitful affair. The event packed 40 presentations, several plenary sessions, a poster session, guest speakers, an awards ceremony, and an executive committee meeting into the week.

The federation houses an enormous database of global observational and simulation data—more than 5 petabytes—and manages the HPC hardware and software infrastructure necessary for scientific climate research. In the nearly two decades since its launch, ESGF has grown to serve 25,000 users on 6 continents.

Among ESGF’s 2018 milestones were support for CMIP6 data (thanks to input4MIPs and obs4MIPs initiatives), beta v3.0 of the software stack installer, OAuth single sign-on integration, and progress in containerized architecture. Read more about the conference and check out ESGF’s GitHub repo.

DOE Machines Dominate Record-Breaking SC18 November 20, 2018 (event-report)

Supercomputing ‘18 (SC18), held Nov. 11–16 in Dallas, broke records for attendees and exhibitors and saw LLNL once again make its presence felt on the world’s biggest HPC stage. For the first time in five years, the U.S. captured the top two spots on the TOP500 List of the world’s fastest supercomputers: Summit at ORNL and Sierra at LLNL.

Highlights from the conference include:

  • Student program keynote from Bruce Hendrickson, associate director for Computing
  • Women in HPC workshop led by Elsa Gonsiorowski
  • Student technical program vice-chaired by Olga Pearce
  • Spack tutorial
  • Flux workshop
  • P3HPC (performance, portability, and productivity) workshop
  • Talks by LLNL experts at industry booths (e.g., Penguin Computing, NVIDIA)

Earth System Grid Federation's Annual Conference Coming Up November 03, 2018 (event)

The LLNL-led international Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) will meet December 3-7 in Washington, DC, to plan the future of Earth system data analysis and more. Registration info is available on the ESGF website along with the conference agenda. Fork this 2017 R&D 100 winner on GitHub.

Good Times at GitHub Universe November 01, 2018 (event-report)

LLNL open-source champions Laura Weber, Ian Lee, and David Beckingsale attended the 2018 GitHub Universe conference in San Francisco. Billed as “a conference for the builders, planners, and leaders defining the future of software”, the team enjoyed hearing about upcoming GitHub enhancements and being able to network with GitHub Federal employees and other GitHub users.

One recurring theme was inner source, the use of open source software development best practices and the establishment of an open-source-like culture within organizations. With this practice the organization may still develop proprietary software, but internally opens up its development.

Flux and Spack Events Coming to Supercomputing '18 October 27, 2018 (event)

LLNL staff are heading to Dallas, Texas, for the 30th annual Supercomputing Conference (SC18) on November 11–16. LLNL is leading 6 tutorials and 16 workshops with topics ranging from data analytics and data compression to performance analysis and productivity. LLNL-developed open-source tools Flux and Spack are subjects of a workshop and a tutorial, respectively. We hope to see you there!

Read more about our past experiences and tips for first-timers. A complete list of LLNL-led sessions can be found on the LLNL Computing website. All times are listed in Central Standard Time.